Royal Worcester

Clarke Commissioned Royal Worcester Cricklite Standards

Royal Worcester was established in 1751 and is believed to be the oldest or second oldest remaining English porcelain brand still in existence today (this is disputed by Royal Crown Derby, which claims 1750 as its year of establishment). Part of the Portmeirion Group since 2009, Royal Worcester remains in the luxury tableware and giftware market, although production in Worcester itself has ended. (Ref 3)

Technically, the Worcester Royal Porcelain Co. Ltd. (known as Royal Worcester) was formed in 1862, and wares produced before that time are known as Worcester porcelain, although the company had a royal warrant from 1788. The enterprise has followed the pattern of other leading English porcelain brands, with increasing success during the 18th and 19th centuries, then a gradual decline during the 20th century, especially the latter half. (Ref 3)

Samuel Clarke commissioned the Royal Worcester Porcelain Company to adapt selected models of their ware to serve as Cricklite and fairy lamp stands. Most of these products are certainly dual purpose, however, those commissioned by Clarke are often marked "Trademark Cricklite".

The following shapes have been identified by members of the Fairy Lamp Club.  Some known shapes are not listed as fairy lamps, i.e. model number 1151 Lotus and number 1293 Mower Girl.  You have to wonder how many other shapes are not identified as fairy lamps.  For example, model number 1290 Figure candelabrum - three lights - 1880 in Royal Worcester Porcelain by Sandon could be a Cricklite stand.  Between 1883 and 1890 there were 54 models listed as "lamp."

Reference 1: Ms. Wendy Cook, The Dyson Perrins Museum Trust (Museum of Royal Worcester) Severn Street, Worchester WR1 2NE England.
Reference 2: Royal Worcester Porcelain by Sandon
Reference 3: Wikipedia

Source: Images courtesy of former Fairy Lamp Club members, on-line auctions, and "Fairy Lamps - Elegance in Candle Lighting" by Ruf.

Grecian Water Carrier - Model 2/125 - Specially designed and made for Clarke's Cricklite

Surprised Bather - Model 486

Model 964

Model 965

Model 1151- Rd No 47870

Model 1212

Model 1151 - Rd No 47870

Model 1202- Rd No 67080

Model 1241 - Rd No 78873

Model 1293 - Rd No 109821

Model 1410 Large - Rd No 141375

Model 1410 Small - Rd No 141375

Model 1410 Large and Small - Rd No 141375

Model 1828

Model 1890 Male & Female Rd No 84463 (M)

Other known, but undocumented, Royal Worcester models

Model 1269 - Fairy Lamp with three shells & coral feet - Royal Worcester Porcelain - Sandon

Model 1270 - Fairy Lamp with three shells & coral feet - Royal Worcester Porcelain - Sandon

Model 1271 - Fairy Lamp with three flower tubes - Royal Worcester Porcelain - Sandon

Model 1272 - Fairy Lamp with three flower tubes - Royal Worcester Porcelain - Sandon

Model 1273 - Fairy Lamp with indented edge - Royal Worcester Porcelain - Sandon

Model 1277 - Fairy Lamp - Royal Worcester Porcelain - Sandon

Model 1278 - Fairy Lamp - Royal Worcester Porcelain - Sandon

Notes:

"Grecian Water Carrier" - Model number 125, 'Class 2' (Class 2 = Statuettes over 8" in height.) It was being made as a stand alone figure from at least 1867 and possibly earlier. The model was made in 4 sizes and each was used as a Cricklite base.  (Antique British Ceramics Information Resource)

"The Bather Surprised" modeled by Thomas (later Sir Thomas) Brock in approximately 1874. This was made in three sizes, each was used as a Cricklite base. Antique British Ceramics Information Resource.  (Ref. 1: 15.5" size shown in RW Shapes File)

According to Royal Worcester Porcelain from 1862 to The Present Day, by Sandon, Plate 29, the modeler was Sir Thomas Brock and the 26" size was made in 1902. It came in three sizes the largest is 26 inches.

"The Bather Surprised" modeled by Thomas (later Sir Thomas) Brock in approximately 1874. This was made in three sizes, each was used as a Cricklite base. Antique British Ceramics Information Resource.  (Ref. 1: 15.5" size shown in RW Shapes File)

Model number 1151 Lotus Flower was identified in Royal Worcester Porcelain - Sandon.  The model illustrated is not stamped with the Royal Worcester trademark.

There are two 'Cairo Water Carriers' both in their plain form and in 'shot enamels'. These water carriers were released as stand alone figures as model No 1250 in 1887. They were modeled by James Hadley after he set up his own independent workshop and the masters were sold to Royal Worcester. They later re-released them as model number 1890 in 1886 as the Cricklite stands.  Source: Antique British Ceramics Information Resource

Model 2019 was actually made in two forms, with and without the dish included in the base.  Source: Antique British Ceramics Information Resource

The Torch Bearer was actually made as a pair of figures, both of which were (as far as I know) only used for Cricklites. They were made in 2 sizes so there should be 4 different versions. These were first issued in 1898.  Source:  British Ceramics Information Resource

The shape number 143/H is a shape number taken over when Royal Worcester bought Hadley's porcelain company in about the very early 1900s.  The H prefix, I think, indicates a Hadley shape. (Source: Tony Kitchen)

Information (Cricklites, candles, and lamps) was provided by Ms. Wendy Cook, The Dyson Perrins Museum Trust (Worcester Porcelain Museum) Severn Street, Worcester WR1 2NE England. (www.worcesterporcelainmuseum.org)

Definition: The term "Shot Enamels" or "Shot Silk Enamels" were a type of finish popular around the turn of the twentieth century.  They were basically an areographed satin glaze that shimmered under just the right lighting conditions.
Antique British Ceramics Information Resource

Fairy Lamp Club Newsletter Articles

Royal Worcester Cricklite Stands