Price's Patent Candle Company, Ltd.

Price's Belmont Works at Battersea in 1849 Employed 700 workers.  Candle making was a big business.

As many of you know, George and Samuel Clarke were well known candle makers in the United Kingdom.  In 1844 George Miller Clarke applied to the British Patent Office in London for a patent on an "improvement in night lights."  In 1857 Samuel Clarke received another patent for improvements under the same patent classification.  

Samuel Clarke continued making candles until he sold his company to the Price's Patent Candle Company in 1910.  Had Samuel Clarke not been a marketing genius and developed the "fairy lamp," I suspect his company's legacy would have gone unnoticed after the sale of his company to Price's.  Instead, Clarke's legacy lives on as the most recognized name in fairy lamps.

Price's Patent Candle Company continued marketing Clarke's candles and some of his fairy lamps for a period of time after 1910.  

As many of you know, George and Samuel Clarke were well known candle makers in the United Kingdom.  In 1844 George Miller Clarke applied to the British Patent Office in London for a patent on an "improvement in night lights."  In 1857 Samuel Clarke received another patent for improvements under the same patent classification.  

Samuel Clarke continued making candles until he sold his company to the Price's Patent Candle Company in 1910.  Had Samuel Clarke not been a marketing genius and developed the "fairy lamp," I suspect his company's legacy would have gone unnoticed after the sale of his company to Price's.  Instead, Clarke's legacy lives on as the most recognized name in fairy lamps.

Price's Patent Candle Company continued marketing Clarke's candles and some of his fairy lamps for a period of time after 1910.  

This is evident by several examples of Clarke's Pyramid Night Light boxes bearing the phrases, "Now Price's Patent Candle Company" and "Manufactured by Price's Patent Candle Company, Limited."  

The Price's Patent Candle Company, after a long and diverse history of owners and product lines, is still in business today and continues to be one of the England's most well known candle manufacturers.

Following are few examples of Price's products, some old, some contemporary, along with some products marketed specifically for use with Prices candles.  In addition, there are advertisements, trade cards and postcards that illustrate a broad range of candle products.

Candle lamps marketed to burn Price's candles

Noah's Ark

Noah's Ark Night Light Holder
for use with
Price's Night Lights
including their Sentinel Night Lights

Bunny

The "Bunny" was marketed by the Price Candle Company but, like Clarke, they did not actually make it.  It was made by Wadeheath Pottery and is marked on the base "Wadeheath Ware England"

Cottage

The style and colors of this "English cottage" are very similar to the Bunny and Noah's Ark; however, it is simply marked "Made in England."

Price's Candle Stand

The heavy metal base is connected to a pressed slag candle holder by a brass fitting.  The shade shown may not be original.  However, the base could have been marketed without a shade.  The base embossed around the bottom edge reads "Price's Patent Candle Co.".  In addition, the base is  embossed with an indecipherable lozenge.  The Trefoil design on the base suggests it may have a religious association.  (Click thumbnails to enlarge)

Clarke candles produced by Price

For a period of time following the the sale of Clark'e Pyramid and Fairy Light Works to Price's Patent Candle Company in 1910. Price continued to market Clarke's candles. The following candle boxes bearing Clarke's brand name include the phrase "Manufactured by Price's Patent Candle Company, Limited" and in some cases included the phrase "At Clarkes 'Pyramid' and 'Fairy' Light Works". Disclaimer: There is no guarantee that the candles shown with the box are original to the box.  (Click thumbnails to enlarge)

Trade Cards

Price, much like Clarke, appreciated the value of advertising;  However, instead of investing in elaborate color ads, Price seemed to concentrate of "Trade Cards".  These cards, much like today's business cards, were handed out to potential customers in hopes they would remember them when the need for candles arises.

These cards often deopicted scenes from historic moments in Englands military history.  On the back of each card is a detailed narrative of the event.  (Click thumbnails to enlarge)

Post Cards

In addition to trade cards, Price made good use of post cards to promote their product.  Follow are a few of the more interesting ones.

Souvenir of Great Wheel
Earl's Court Exposition
1905

Robin and Richard were two pretty men.

Sing a Song of Sixpence, pocket full of Rye.

Candle Boxes and Ads

Miscellaneous 

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